Saturday, November 21, 2015

Pro Fiber — Long Lasting Repair

Before now, most of the beneficial haircare effects of in-salon treatments were eliminated in the first few shampoos.

With the new Pro Fiber treatment, developed by L'Oréal Research laboratories with 15 unique pending patents, you can have long-lasting repair of the hair fiber and extend the life of your treatment at home for 6 weeks.


We start by doing a consultation to determine which of the treatments is best for your hair, depending on the amount of damage and your daily hair care routine. After selecting the right treatment for your hair, we do your Pro Fiber treatment in the salon.

The best part about the treatment is how you can keep it up at home. It's so easy to maintain!
Just use the Pro Fiber Shampoo, chosen for your hair health, and use the Re-Charge as a conditioner every fourth shampoo. How simple is that?! No extra time required. No setting aside a certain night to do a long treatment. Just shampoo, re-charge, and go.

Come talk to one of our stylists and do the easy 5- minute Pro Fiber consultation to see if Pro Fiber can work for you.








Revive — For Slightly Damaged Hair
REVIVE your locks from everyday wear and tear with Pro Fiber, the treatment that truly lasts.


Restore — For Damaged Hair
Struggling with rough hair, split ends, and uneven color? RESTORE your locks, with Pro Fiber.



Recover — For Very Damaged Hair
Feel like your hair is rough, fragile, and breaking? RECOVER your locks, with Pro Fiber.

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Contour Obsessed — Part 4: Using Hair Color to Contour My Face Shape

Contouring requires the eye of an expert colorist. First, they will identify your unique face shape and bone structure by brushing hair back behind the ears to expose the full outline of your face (see Contour Obsessed, Part 3).

The benchmark that is most commonly used is the “oval” shape due to its well-balanced and symmetrical proportions. So, the next step is for your colorist to decode where the darker and lighter shades need to be positioned around your face in order to re-sculpt the appearance and achieve a more “oval “shape. To keep the effect looking natural and subtle, the color shades chosen should not exceed two shades above or below your natural hair color and tones should be selected to compliment your skin. The different color shades and tones are then applied either free hand for a more subtle finish, or highlighted separately for more defined pieces. This combination allows the colorist to tailor the application to suit you.



Round/Square Face:
To elongate a round or square face, your colorist will lighten the top of the hair and the ends using a free-hand technique. Shadow and depth is created at the sides of the face using a darker shade. The lightness at the top of the head and shading around the sides will make the face shape appear slimmer and more contoured.

Diamond/Oblong/Rectangular Face:
To widen the facial features of these face shapes, your colorist will keep the roots and the underneath of the hair dark to create shadow at the top of the head and around the jawline. A single highlight around the face is used to frame it and lighter pieces are weaved in front of the ears with an ombre effect to make an elongated face shape appear more oval.

Heart/Triangular Face:
In order to soften the shape of the chin without widening the forehead, your colorist will apply a darker color to the top of the head and crown areas, and will apply lighter pieces freehand through the mid lengths and ends to lighten under the jawline. The section around the hairline is also lightened to highlight the face. Ombre & Sombré techniques are well suited to this face shape.

Credit information and images: L'Oreal Professionnel UK
Read the original post here: Contouring

Contour Obsessed — Part 3: Identifying My Face Shape

The black outer lines in the diagrams represent each face shape described. The benchmark oval shaped face that sits within the black outlines help to demonstrate which proportions of the face will need to appear “re-sculpted” using hair contouring to achieve the more symmetrical and well-balanced oval shape.

You have a round face if...
The length and width of your face is equal. Characteristics include a shorter forehead and chin and a rounded jawline.

You have a square face if...
The length, width and jawline are equal in length. Characteristics include wider facial features, sharper jawline and shorter forehead.

You have a rectangular face if...
This face shape has similar characteristic to the oblong face being longer than it is wide but with a more defined angular jawline and a broader forehead.

You have an oblong shape face if...
The length of your face is approx. more than 1 ½ times longer than wide, with a broad forehead, cheekbones and jaw line. The shape will roughly resemble a rectangle with softer corners.

You have a diamond shape face if...
Your cheekbones are the wider than your forehead and jawline.

You have a triangular/ heart shape face if...
You have a wider forehead and a narrower pointed chin, similar to an inverted triangle.

Credit information and images: L'Oreal Professionnel UK
Read the original post here: Contouring

Monday, November 16, 2015

Contour Obsessed — Part 2: What is Hair Contouring & Will It Work For Me?


Inspired by the makeup trend of the moment, hair contouring is a custom-made color application technique that has revolutionized the use of haircolor. This innovative technique uses the careful placement of colors around the face and, by playing with light and shadow, can alter the appearance of your face shape by accentuating your best features and enhancing your natural skin tone without the application of makeup.

What is hair contouring?
Hair contouring is a coloring technique that uses a combination of free-hand application and highlighting paired with the careful positioning of different tones and depths around the face to highlight and shadow targeted areas. Darker tones create shadows and are used to shorten or narrow the face shape, while lighter tones elongate and lengthen the face shape by reflecting light. This clever placement of color and the careful selection of complimentary tones perform an optical illusion and make your face appear more defined and features more accentuated.

Will hair contouring work for me?
Definitely! Hair contouring is a 100% bespoke (customized) coloring service that is literally designed to suit your unique facial structure, features and skin tone. The colors are selected based on your skin tone and positioned based on your structure and features.

Will it look natural?
The complexity of this technical consultation and application requires a professional to ensure colors are perfectly blended into the hair and suit your skin tone. The subtle shades, the ability of the colorist to use careful positioning beneath the parting and tailor the application method to your needs, means that this coloring technique can look extremely natural…No one will ever know!

Is it low maintenance?
The combination of application techniques and subtlety of shades means that this technique can be extremely low maintenance with regrowth being soft and diffused.

How do I maintain my customized color?
To protect your contoured highlights, we recommend using Lumino Contrast by serie expert. This range helps to brighten and enhance the appearance of multi-dimensional tones in highlighted hair. Formulated to target the highlighted strands, it leaves them looking brilliantly accentuated with an added radiant shine.

Looking to get the longest wear out of your color? Washing your hair frequently and using hairdryers can take its toll on your color. Try Vitamino Color A:OX to protect your bespoke contoured color against fade, dullness and environmental aggressors. The Vitamino range leaves your color looking shiny and your hair feeling nourished with prolonged hair color radiance.

Credit text: L'Oreal Professionnel UK
Credit image: L'Oreal Professionnel US
Read the original post here: Contouring

Sunday, November 15, 2015

Contour Obsessed — Part 1: Contouring Overview

If you've been following trends in makeup for the past few years, you have most likely noticed the contouring trend. It seems like everyone is contour obsessed. In previous years, makeup contouring was a trick for the pros, used only on runways and in photoshoots to enhance the model's look. But thanks to social media and easily accessible tutorial videos, everyone can now contour like the pros. Kim Kardashian, known for her flawless contoured makeup, has brought new buzz to the trend. Powders, foundations and two-tone makeup kits have become best sellers to boost cleavage, sharpen cheekbones, or sculpt a shapely face.

Contouring provides subtle definition and dimension, enhancing the best aspects of the face. It's not a one-size-fits-all makeup technique and must be tailored specifically to each person. In makeup, the trend has been exploding for several seasons, and now it's time for contouring to make its way to hair.

Contouring enhances the shape of the face, playing with shading and highlighting to exaggerate or soften features. In hair, the guidelines are the same as makeup: dark shades create shadows and give a visual effect of less volume, while light tones add highlights and make the hair (or face) look more voluminous. When done correctly, it can help enhance your natural face shape and create an overall visual balance to your look. For a balanced, natural result, the professionally created color must blend perfectly into your hair and be suited to your skin tone.

In Hollywood, celebrities are already wearing contoured haircolor. Drew Barrymore, Scarlett Johansson and Jessica Alba are making this "made in the UK" fashion a trend in the United States. Not sure what your natural face shape is? Wondering if contouring could work for you? Talk to a professional colorist and ask how they would adjust your haircolor to maximize your natural beauty and contour your face shape.

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Frequently Asked Questions About Exfoliation

Winter can be a harsh season for your skin, but you can easily combat dryness and flakiness if you exfoliate regularly and remember to moisturize, moisturize, moisturize! Here's what you need to know to keep parched skin at bay.

What is exfoliation?
Your skin is in constant cycles of regrowth, producing new skin cells to replace old or damaged ones. In winter, however, the process slows down. Exfoliation helps promote new skin growth, contributing to a healthy, glowing complexion. It can also prevent dead skin cells from clogging your pores.

How often should I scrub?
Twice a week is a good place to start. It's possible to over-exfoliate, which can cause tightness, itching, redness and irritation. Pay attention to how your skin reacts to the exfoliation before you do it more often.

What exfoliates the skin?
Jojoba beads, which are round spheres, are gentle exfoliators. Other natural exfoliating ingredients include salt and sugar, as well as ground nuts, grains and seeds. Depending on the sensitivity of your skin, you may want to test the exfoliator on a small area before use.

What's the best way to exfoliate?
Always exfoliate gently and in small circular motions. Scrubs that have larger particles and a coarser texture, like salt scrubs, are best used on tough areas of skin like feet and elbows. Sugar-based scrubs are less abrasive and work well on more delicate areas such as the face. No matter what type you use, always be sure to moisturize afterward.

Is there a less messy option?
Dry brushing is another method of exfoliation. You'll need a body brush with natural bristles and a long handle. Stand in the tub, but don't turn on the water. Begin at your toes and brush your skin in the direction of your heart using long sweeping motions. Go over each area a few times.

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

3 Creative Makeup Ideas to Transform Yourself This Halloween


Some Halloween costumes are all about the outfit, while others are all about the makeup. Here are three memorable dress-up ideas that combine the two and are sure to make you the hit of the night.
Go Gray Scale
Use a water-activated gray base coat on the parts of your skin that will be visible when you're in costume. Use a darker shade for blush and contouring your face and white for highlighting your brows and nose. Dark grey eyeliner works for your lips with a touch of balm to keep them moist. Use jet-black powder on your hair or wear a wig. An era-appropriate gray-toned outfit completes the look.
Pop Art Comic Characters
Start with a white cream or base and set with powder. Apply a super vibrant eye shadow and draw in exaggerated eyebrows with black eyeliner. Outline your face and add contour lines to your cheekbones, nose, ears and chin with black. Use a cotton swab to apply red dots to your entire face over the white base. Finish with a bright red lip.
Half Sugar Skull
When you do a half-face of sugar skull makeup, you not only look creepy, you also don't have to worry about symmetry. Start with a white base on half your face. Next draw a flower around your eye in a bold color and fill it in completely. Draw a black circle around the flower and fill in around the petals. Draw a cobweb on your forehead, a dramatic eyebrow that ends in a swirl, and a filled-in half heart for your nose. Outline your lips in black and draw a skeleton mouth line to your ear.
Happy haunting!

Friday, August 14, 2015

#OnceIWasABeehive : Movie Hairstyles — Girls Camp to Glam

It's easy to go "from girls camp to glam" with these totally wearable styles from the Once I Was a Beehive movie. Just follow the simple steps below or click on each title to watch a video tutorial.

Faux Dutch Braid:
1. Prep hair with Next Day Hair
2. Divide into 3 ponytails and secure with clear bands
3. Braid each ponytail with medium tension and then secure
4. Loosen braids
5. Secure braids with bobby pins around head


Braided Bun:
1. Prep hair with Next Day Hair
2. Divide hair into two ponytails and secure
3. Prep ponytails with True Grip
4. Fishtail each ponytail and secure
5. Loosen braids
6. Wrap braids around ponytail base and secure with bobby pins





Messy Side Buns:
1. Prep hair with Beach Waves
2. Twist sections and dry product into hair
3. Part hair diagonally into two sections
4. Put each section into a messy bun using invisibobble (or hair elastic)
5. Arrange hair around the bun and tuck in loose pieces


Bubble Pony: (video not available)
1. Prep hair with Densite and dry into hair
2. Spray with Next Day Hair to add extra texture
3. Brush back and secure hair into ponytail on top of crown
4. Approximately two to three inches down the ponytail, wrap with another band
5. Continue down the length of the hair
6. Hold one strand at the bottom of the ponytail, slide ponytail up to create the bubbles

Thursday, August 13, 2015

#OnceIWasABeehive: Movie Haircolor — Method to the Madness

Acting can take a toll on your hair. Often, the hair is thrashed. Over-processed and over-worked. My job is to make the actors look great, according to the project specifications. And it definitely makes my job more difficult if the hair has been damaged, or if roots are showing when they arrive on set.

Knowing this, I wanted to make sure when I did the haircolor for this movie, that it could last throughout the filming process. This was an independent film and the whole thing was shot in three weeks. We worked very long days. There was absolutely no time for color touch-ups during the filming process. So I needed to have a plan.

This was my master color plan and the thoughts behind it for this project...

Lisa: Her hair is in great condition. I do her color on a regular basis and it was easy to make her hair look good because she takes care of it. She uses professional shampoo and conditioner, and she does the treatments I send home with her. I broke her base with DIARichesse 15 vol. and balayaged her hair to give very natural highlights so it wouldn't be as noticeable if her roots started growing out during filming. I glazed Lisa's hair with DIAlight to seal the cuticle down and to add shine, so it would look great on camera. I used Olaplex on her hair and had Lisa use the take-home treatment too, just to make sure her hair would be strong and healthy, and so it would be easy to pull up and not get breakage. Her hair is naturally very fine. I also added clip-in extensions to give a little more fullness and glamour for the shots before she goes to camp. I thought it fit her role perfectly

Hailey: I did something very similar to her hair as I wanted her to look fantastic, but very natural. I broke her base with DIA and balayaged highlights. I also added lowlights because her ends were getting a little too light and the hair was losing dimension overall. Her natural curl was really fun to work with. Tecniart Perfect Texture worked great on her hair and made it super easy to style.

Paris: Her mother is a hairstylist, so Paris is not new to haircolor. She came
in with a slight ombre look and had highlights toward the ends of her hair. Maclain (the director) wanted her to look more naturally pretty, not glamour pretty, so we took her light brown hair to a darker and deeper color. I did various shades of mocha by DIA to give her natural looking color, not wig-like color, and so that it looked like it grew out of her own head. We also used Olaplex on her. I think it turned out gorgeous!

Claire:  She is a natural brunette and needed to be blonde so that she looked like Lisa's daughter. She was probably the most challenging because she had a lot going on in her hair already, and because I needed to do a major color change. Doing a major change could compromise her hair further and make it very difficult to style her hair on set each day. Also, another issue would be her roots. Taking her too light meant that the roots would be showing about a week into filming. (Did I mention that the scenes are not shot in order? On any given day we could be shooting anywhere in the timeline of the script, usually multiple timeline jumps per day.) I needed to make Claire's blonde believable, but not be so far off from her natural color that she would have horrid roots. I lifted up her natural a few shades, controlling the warmth with Majirel Cool Cover. Then I removed some previous color from her ends and balayaged the whole head. I used Olaplex, which made it possible to go lighter and fix the previous color. My process made the ends the lightest part, like nature would have it, but keep the roots a tad darker so the color would look better for a longer period of time. This also made the light blonde look as natural as possible against her skin tone.

Kaley:  She needed to be a red head. We colored her hair a deeper red, but when the director saw her, he said she looked too sexy and that she needed to look more nerdy. Hah! We ended up lightening it all up and making her a more vibrant copper. I thought she look fantastic! I don't know if I would call it nerdy, but I loved that color on her. Once we removed/lightened out some of the other red, we glazed it all with DIA copper. (Photo by @kaleymccormack)

Audrey: She had a good base for her color, but needed something a
little more edgy. I freshened up her already ombre hair with DIARichesse and DIAlight, then I added some blue extensions to give her more of an edge. I chose extensions because they would be less damaging to her previously compromised hair (Olaplex to the rescue, again), and also because we wouldn't have to worry about the blue tone fading during filming.


Zoe: Her hair had streaks of blonde and red when we started, with some of her natural brown. We wanted her to look natural, since it suits her character to not look like she colors her hair. But we wanted the natural looking color to flatter her skin tone. We did an all-over, rich brunette color with DIARichesse, and Olaplex.

That was my thought process behind the color for this project. The women were all so naturally beautiful already (isn't it great working with actresses?!), so they probably could have made any color look great. But I think their haircolor suited them and the project needs, and we didn't have to do any mid-filming touch ups. For specific formulas, please contact me by email: info@culturessalon.com



Wednesday, August 12, 2015

Claim Your Limited Edition S'mores Lotion Set from the "Once I Was a Beehive" Movie

Want to get a 3-pack of our Limited Edition S'mores Whipped Body Creams, made for the release of the Once I Was a Beehive movie?!

It's so easy! Just do the following:

1. Buy a ticket to any Opening Weekend showing of the Once I Was a Beehive movie.

2. Bring your ticket by and show it to us. (See below if you don't live in the area.)

3. Get your free 3-pack of our S'mores Whipped Body Creams. No purchase necessary.

Limit one free set per person. Must have tickets for a showing during the dates of August 12, 2015 through August 17, 2015. To claim in person, please bring your tickets to Cultures Salon, 360 S State Street, Clearfield, Utah. Offer good while supplies last.

Don't live close by? Just send an email with a photograph of your tickets to: info@culturessalon.com and include your mailing address. We will send you an invoice to pay S&H ($5.95) by PayPal. When you've paid the invoice, we will ship your free lotion set to you!

Want to buy an extra set? Just let us know in your email and we can add that to your invoice too. ($12.00 per set, plus S&H.)

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Summer Skin Care for Sensitive Skin

Skin care for sensitive skin can be tricky regardless of the season, but summer poses some unique challenges. When skin becomes irritated, invisible inflammation sets in, encouraging the production of free radicals that can actually cause wrinkles and skin-aging. That's why it's so important to use the best cleanser for sensitive skin and find the right products for sensitive skin. Skin irritation in the summer is common, due to a variety of different issues, which makes sensitive skin care a crucial part of your summer routine. Let's break down exactly why skin tends to be more sensitive in the summer and what you can do about it.

UV Rays
Everyone knows that skin redness caused by a sunburn is bad, but what some people don't realize is that simply tanning is extremely damaging to the skin. Even a slight tanning color of the skin is a sign of injury. Exposing your skin to UV rays without proper protection weakens the structure of the skin, causing lines, wrinkles, sagging and stretched pores, and it can make your skin more sensitive in the future. 90% of your skin's signs of aging are a direct result of the sun. So always wear a broad spectrum sunscreen and stay in the shade when you can!

Swimming
Chlorine is one of the biggest summer irritants for skin. Even if you don't frequent the neighborhood pool often, minimal contact with chlorine can leave your skin dry and flaky. No matter what skin type you have, always cleanse after coming into contact with chlorine. It can seep into your pores and cause irritation and dryness, so it's important to find the right cleanser like Bioelements Sensitive Skin Cleanser [available at Cultures Salon]. After washing off the chlorine, make sure to moisturize in order to treat your skin and prevent further irritation.

Sweat
We all sweat more in the summer; there's just no getting around this issue. The act of sweating is actually good for us, because it pushes impurities and bacteria out of your pores. However, if you let it sit on the skin for any prolonged period of time, the bacteria can get re-absorbed back into your skin and cause breakouts, excess oil, inflammation and dehydration. The right cleansing oil formula will gently cleanse away this pore-clogging sweat, and it will bind your skin's oil and impurities.

Ineffective Sunscreen
It's shocking how often people choose the wrong sunscreen. Above all, make sure to choose a formula that's labeled "broad spectrum" -- that's the only way to ensure you're protected against burning UVB and UVA rays. It's crucial to choose the right sensitive skin care products, especially when it comes to sunscreen. Double check to make sure it doesn't contain artificial colorants, synthetic fragrance, parabens, DEA, phthalates or harsh irritants and that it's been dermatologist and clinically tested to be non-irritating, like Bioelements broad spectrum sunscreens [available at Cultures Salon]. And it's crucial that you apply the right amount, and apply it often enough. A whole shot glass (about 1 ounce) should be used on all exposed areas of the face and body, with a pea sized amount for the face alone. And re-apply every 2 hours when exposed to the sun.

If you have any questions or are interested in more skin care for sensitive skin, leave a comment below or contact us directly.
(This blog was originally written by Teresa Stenzel for Bioelements Professional Skin Care.)